Requirements elicitation and validation – It’s all about a good story

During any project, the process whereby the business analyst validates the requirements gathered from the project stakeholders is of utmost importance. Getting the collection signed off and frozen is key, but we all know it’s a challenge, and it’s not going to happen at the first attempt.

When I think about how to do this, I always think about the end game. The aim of validating these requirements should create the foundations of a story that ultimately leaves your audience happy. Continue reading

Underdocumented elements of business analysis…

A LinkedIn update from Giles the other day read “Working on more reliable mechanisms for the transfer of the underdocumented elements of business analysis. Osmosis doesn’t quite cut it.” I’m not sure what exactly he meant (is underdocumented a word) but I joked  that perhaps he should use the ‘back of a fag packet’ approach. It got me thinking about requirements and the how best to share them and ultimately get them signed off.

What is a good requirement? Continue reading

What do you do if you inherit a ‘trainwreck’?

So we’ve all been there.. You’ve heard the rumours, there’s a project which has become a problem.. It’s become a ‘trainwreck’. I’ve used the term ‘trainwreck’ after reading such a post written by Steven in the SLAW website and I thought i’d add some comments.

Trainwrecks happen for many different reasons, whether that be poor requirements, poor project management, limited project resource, poor support from a vendor or incredibly short timescales to deliver. The important thing to realise is that they happen more regularly the people think. Continue reading

Is it the method or the people that complete projects?

It’s an interesting point raised very well by Dan Rockwell in his post titled ‘Refocusing on people.’

In the #legalIT world I often hear too much emphasis on methodologies, systems and processes and not enough about the people who are actually doing the work.

It’s simple, the more you feel part of a team and are involved the less you feel like a cog in a process and are willing to go the extra mile to get things done.

You can follow Dan on twitter through @Leadershipfreak

Outlook 2010 – Two things I like already..

I have been beta testing a Win7 and Office 2010 desktop for over month now and I suddenly realised I haven’t mentioned some of the good features of Outlook.  I am running a 2003 desktop next to a 2010 one and the Outlook definitely performs better in 2010..

Two main ones that have caught my eye are; Continue reading

Should Legal IT departments be innovative?

I was thinking the other day about Legal IT and who was going to define its future? It got me thinking about innovation in LegalIT and what our 3 main customers expect. They are each with their own requirements and needs, so do law firms, the lawyers and the law firms clients expect IT departments to be innovative?

A broad definition of what innovation is; “Innovation is the improving of an existing product, service, system or process and the introduction of something better.”

Continue reading

If I were a manager, i’d……

If I were ever directly responsible for a team (pls rescue them now) I would strive for the following leadership qualities and not just during periodic reviews and appraisals.

1 – Provide specific feedback and solutions balancing both the -ve and +ve
2 – Not to micro manage but also not seem too stand off-ish. Provide a balance between the two
3 – Show interest in the person not just the person doing the job
4 – Communicate fairly and listen to everyone’s ideas and concerns
5 – Assist with career advice and development
6 – Have a clear vision and strategy
7 – Have key technical skills to help the team when necessary

There are probably many others so are there any others you can think of?